Salary Survey Results: Electrical/Electronic Engineers 2008

Electronic Design has released their 2008 salary survey for electrical and electronic engineers. Average salary for design and development engineers is now $94k (base salary). Engineering management is up to $116k. The highest paying regions are Pacific and Mountain at $114k and $103k, respectively. The lowest regions are East North Central and West North Central at $87.4k and $90.3k (I guess North Central USA is not the place to be).

Other interesting tidbits include a very telling disparity between men ($97.5k) and women ($78.6k). Starting salaries are around $50k. Those with one to four years of experience are pulling in $60.5k, at five to nine years $76k, continuing in like manner to $106k for those with 20 to 24 years experience. The highest paid specializations are ICs and semiconductors ($122k) and computer product design ($118k). At the other end we find safety and security ($80k) and components and subassemblies ($84.9k). Most other specializations were in the 90k range, such as R&D, test & measurement, software design and automotive electronics.

Engineering education was not included in the survey, but I have little doubt that it would drag the numbers down. Then again, the hours are completely different.

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