Kepler's Supernova still #I

Chandra data suggests Kepler's Supernova was actually a type Ia supernova

Type Ib, Ic and II supernovae occur during the gravitational collapse of a massive star, the core forms a neutron star or in some cases black hole and the associated energy release blows off the outer layers.
In contrast type Ia comes from older binary stars, when a white dwarf acquires additional mass and exceeds the critical Chandrasekhar mass limit and blows up completely in a nuclear detonation.

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