Teachers: An Index for Cognitive Daily

Cognitive Daily is a reflection of my teaching. In fact, one of the ways I pick articles for Dave to discuss on the blog is to pass along articles I've used in class. It has occurred to us that our Research categories (like Movement and Exercise, or Video Games / Technology) are not the most helpful for teachers seeking new examples, and so I've indexed some of the blog posts using categories that are more familiar to general and cognitive psychology teachers.

You'll find it under the new tab Teaching Index, where topics are listed in the order many psychology textbooks follow (biological bases, perception, cognition, development, social and personality). That made more sense to me than alphabetical, because it grouped areas in useful ways (perception and visual attention, for example).

This is not an attempt to index the whole blog, but if there's something I've missed in terms of an existing post or a useful category, please let me know in the comments.

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Terrific! I hope more posts will be added--I want to recommend CogDaily to the language educators who read my blog, and this would be good for demonstrating CogDaily's usefulness. I could swear there were a lot more good posts on teaching and learning, though!

Thanks for your hard work!

This is an excellent blog. Check out my neuroscience/neurotechnology blog if you get a chance. I just recently did a post on dopamine's involvement in pleasure.