On How I Was Attacked By A Kracken On My Way Home

Obviously, U-Haul has chosen a business model that will center on my future rentals.

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Then I stared the great beast in the eye

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You can see all the Super Graphics here. My favorites, excluding tiny above, include Limulus and the Tully Monster. Interestingly, the U-Haul site is chock-o-block full of information on these creatures, desktops you can download, and coloring pages (there goes my Thursday).
Giant squid are deep-sea creatures. Since the waters around Newfoundland are not deep, why or how do they end up there? One theory is that the Gulf Stream, a powerful current that flows northward along North America's east coast, carries them from the deep oceans. The Gulf Stream is a fast-flowing warm water current that eventually meets up with the Labrador Current, a very cold and fast-moving current that flows south from the Arctic. These two currents meet off the northeastern shores of Newfoundland, where there is a sudden drop in temperature. Scientists know that squid in general don't react well to a drastic change, so that could help to explain why giant squid succumb to this environment. Evidence of this theory is provided by the fact that Newfoundland has been the landing place for more giant squid in the fall and winter months. However, some scientists believe that squid may already be worn out and sick by the time they reach these waters. They may indeed be driven from their home waters in search of food. While there is no conclusive evidence of what happens to a giant squid traveling along these currents, this theory could explain why the shores of Newfoundland become their ultimate, if unintended, destinations.

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Hee... when I was in graduate school in Alabama, I got a little homesick for my native isle of Newfoundland whenever I saw that one :)

By Jonathan Martin (not verified) on 13 Mar 2008 #permalink