Rowe on Christian and Pagan Influences on America

Jon Rowe is guesting on Sandefur's blog this week and has this essay on the dual influence of Christian and Pagan sources in American history. I think he nails the issue almost completely. Like him, I thought the ACLU's lawsuit threat against LA County over their seal was pretty silly. But in most cases, the ACLU is right on church and state issues, despite the often hysterical overreactions from the religious right.

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Los Angeles County has decided to remove a tiny cross from their county seal under threat of a lawsuit from the ACLU. A lot of Christians are up in arms about this, and for once I agree with them, at least in part. No one is a more outspoken proponent of separation of church and state than I am, as…
The Federal government has settled an ACLU lawsuit by prohibiting further support for the Silver Ring Thing abstinence-only sex education program until the program is changed to eliminate the overtly religious content of the course. Under the deal, the Silver Ring Thing program won't be eligible…
In today's Carnival of the Vanities is a link to an article on this blog about a strange church/state ruling. The facts of the case are that the Byron, California school district has a very controversial 3 week unit in their World History class for middle school students in which, in order to teach…
Julian Sanchez has a new column that is so devestatingly on the mark concerning the myth of Christian persecution that it makes me want to create an award to balance off the Robert O'Brien Trophy. In particular, he beautifully nails this bit of pure demagoguery: Even when genuine cases of…

Slightly off-topic, but I really dislike the use of the word "pagan" to describe anything non-christian. To me it holds the same type of disrepectful overtones as the world "infidel" does to non-muslims. Pagan is a brand of theistic belief, and should be used for that purpose only, in my opinion. /rant

By Matthew Phillips (not verified) on 31 Dec 2004 #permalink

I think it's equally important to point out that many of the Founding Fathers were Masons and Deists -- two groups which contemporary conservative evangelical Christians would not consider to be Christians. It's really quite odd, then, when these same individuals come esposing a Christian Nation theme.