The future of philosophical discourse.

Seen in a comment on A Philosophy Job Market Blog:

... instead of writing "QED" at the end of proofs, I think we should all start writing "pwned." I want this change to be my legacy to philosophy.

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Seen in a comment on A Philosophy Job Market Blog:

... instead of writing "QED" at the end of proofs, I think we should all start writing "pwned." I want this change to be my legacy to philosophy.

Interesting. I'd always associated this sort of "in-group jargon" with early teenagers trying to baffle their parents, but I think I'm noticing increasing use among bloggers.

This isn't intended to be some sort of insult, by the way, just an observation.

By Scott Belyea (not verified) on 22 Feb 2008 #permalink

O RLY? As web-based social entertainments become a more pervasive part of popular culture it is to be expected that the shorthand forms and novel constructs of those environments (even if they make for nearly impenetrable in-game conversation) will disseminate. Even the folk history of MMOs has penetrated beyond web parlance and into the larger culture (i.e. Leeroy Jenkins). "Pwned", if anyone ever figures out just how to pronounce it, might become a part of standard everyday English someday, not just the parlance of the l33t.

Scott, you don't think that "QED" is also a form of in-group jargon? (How many of us regularly speak or write in Latin, for example?)

By philosoraptor (not verified) on 22 Feb 2008 #permalink

Interesting. I'd always associated this sort of "in-group jargon" with early teenagers trying to baffle their parents, but I think I'm noticing increasing use among bloggers.

It's from gaming. The kiddies picked it up from them. Most of these things are "AOLisms", but that one isn't.

See also: "Camping"

But "AOLisms" don't even originate in "trying to confuse the 'rents", either... it has more to do with saving time, lack of spelling ability, and typos. The fact that it annoys the hell out of your parents is an extra benefit, and increases propagation.

I heartily endorse this idea.

To avoid obscurisms like QED or pwned, just write "So there!"

I've been doing that since high school. (The teacher liked when I did it and it became the class norm.) My students certainly have had no trouble remembering what it means.

I have been known to grade papers with incredulous 'LOLs' written in the margin. I think the kids appreciate it.

It's official, I'm finishing my thesis with "kthxbai".