Helping you get ready to celebrate tomorrow.

Because, of course, tomorrow is Mole Day. According to the National Mole Day Foundation:

Celebrated annually on October 23 from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m., Mole Day commemorates Avogadro's Number (6.02 x 10^23), which is a basic measuring unit in chemistry. Mole Day was created as a way to foster interest in chemistry. Schools throughout the United States and around the world celebrate Mole Day with various activities related to chemistry and/or moles.

Last year, I put up a post on Mole Day explaining the mole concept and why it matters in chemistry. But there was a little bit of grumbling that by posting it on Mole Day, I didn't give people fair warning ahead of time that there would be a reason to celebrate.

Please consider this your fair warning. Make proper arrangements for your mole sauce, your guacamole, your 6.02 x 1023 kernels of popcorn, or grains of rice, or champagne bubbles, or granules of Pixie Stix filling.

And while you're planning your Mole Day celebration, here's a festive Mole Day song for you to enjoy:

More like this

This is National Chemistry Week. It's always chosen to coincide with whichever calendar week includes October 23 (or 10/23), since October 23 is "Mole Day". "Huh? Why would chemists celebrate a furry critter that burrows underground?" Not that mole. The mole chemists celebrate is a unit. 1 mole…
Hey, it's National Chemistry Week (and it has been since yesterday). Also, from 6:02 AM until 6:02 PM today, it was Mole Day. I had hoped to have lots of time to wallow in the festivities, crack Mole Day jokes, and so on, but as it turns out I have 6.02 x 10^23 things on my to-do list today, so y'…
It's mole day. The mole day site is down (try it later), but you can find out about it on Wikipedia. Mole Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated among chemists in North America on October 23, between 6:02 AM and 6:02 PM[1], making the date 6:02 10/23 in the American style of writing dates. The…
Dr. Free-Ride: So, you know this Friday is Mole Day. Elder offspring: It is? What does that mean exactly? Dr. Free-Ride: Do you remember what a mole is? Not the animal, but the quantity. Elder offspring: Not really. Dr. Free-Ride's better half: It's a convenient unit of measure for things like…

My toe is a tapin. Yet the pictures are only marginally more logical than the llama song.