Global Warming Coverage Last Week Contributed Only 5% to Total News Agenda; Dwarfed by Attention to Iraq, Iran, and 2008 Presidential Race

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Last week, global warming cracked the top 5 news stories at Pew's media attention index, but only accounted for roughly 5% of the total news hole across outlets, dwarfed by the roughly 40% of news attention captured by the combined issues of Iraq, Iran, and the 2008 Presidential horserace.

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