Going Green: Activating WSJ Readers on Climate Change

How do you engage the Republican base on global warming, connecting the issue to their core values and interests? For one part of this segment, as I have argued, you re-frame the issue as a moral and religious matter. But for another segment, it comes down to investment potential, as depicted in this story appearing Monday in the Wall Street Journal. Apparently, there's money to be made in green investing, or so WSJ readers are told.

For Holly Isdale, managing director and head of wealth advisory at Lehman Brothers, global warming isn't a scientific theory -- it's an investment opportunity. "It's not just tree huggers" who think about global warming, say Ms. Isdale. "There's money to be made, and people want to know how to make it."

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