Favio Devastation Becoming Clear

This from Reuters AlertNet:

On Thursday, the cyclone Favio demolished large parts of the southern coast in the province of Inhambane. Winds reportedly hit 240 km/h as the storm tore through the tourist town of Vilanculos heading north past outlying villages, destroying schools, hospitals and the homes of thousands of people in its path....In the town of Vilanculos and its surrounding area alone, 30,000 people are now without a roof over their heads.

Another report, from Reuters, says that some people were actually sleeping when the storm hit Vilanculos, suggesting that warnings were not effective or widely disseminated.

Meanwhile, keep an eye on Gamede, which is starting to look pretty massive and scary (see below), and which will probably be the subject of my next post....

i-1d96babaeb1047560fa426df06111c54-S Indian Feb 23.jpg

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