Gleaned: Suspicious women, sneaky cops, fair-minded children. Plus flu.

Here's what I distracted myself with this morning. Don't mix these at home.

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Wired Sci examines how Testosterone Makes People Suspicious of One Another. And that's a hell of a photo.

New Flu Vaccines Could Protect Against All Strains If all goes well, of course. Not to count on at this point, but an interesting look at one direction in vaccine development. I covered another approach in an Technology Review article last year, when I also looked at the weird history of adjuvants. (If you want, check out my complete vaccine coverage. You can find also some other good ones at the Technology Review vaccine tag)

Zephoria (aka Danah Boyd) gets rightly worked up about a cop who broke Facebook policy and lied ... in order to show that kids on Facebook could be embarrassed.

Ed Yong takes a fairer look at human nature: egalitarian children grow into meritocratic teens

That and some grant writing, morning's all done.

 

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