Film footage of classic neuroscience experiments

Here are 5 short clips from a film called The Squid and its Giant Nerve Fiber, which was made at the Plymouth Marine Laboratory in the 1970s. One of the clips includes footage of Alan Hodgkin performing patch voltage clamp experiments on the squid axon.

Hodgkin, together with Andrew Huxley, used the voltage clamp technique to elucidate the mechanism of the action potential. The pair were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology in 1963 for their work.

(Via Pharyngula.)

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