ionpsych... get it! hahaha.

There's a great blog called ionpsych being run by Dan Simons (of Invisible Gorilla fame). The posts are all by graduate students in a science writing for public consumption class. I'm glad people are starting to teach us overly technical scientists how to communicate in graduate school. I'm not aware of any other class out there dedicated to teaching psychology and neuroscience students how to best communicate their ideas to the world.

Anyway, here's one of my favorite posts from Audrey Lustig:

How do people judge fashion design? Fashion experts are notorious for using vague criteria, saying things like "I know it when I see it." This kind of response implies that good design can't be analyzed objectively. In a recent interview, Project Runway's Tim Gunn even claims that people should avoid consciously analyzing fashion:

Read the rest here and check out all the other great writing.

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Thanks for the shout out! :)