Art, games, life, obsession

Jerry Gretzinger has a project, one that never ends. What started as a little doodle has grown into a sprawling, detailed map that is maintained and expanded by following rules — rules that increase complexity organically, using chance.

It's cool and strange at the same time.

Gretzinger also has a blog.

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That's ... one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen.

By Icyclectic (not verified) on 14 Jun 2012 #permalink

No! God did it!

Just kidding great vid :) Reminds me of the wee program Richard Dawkins wrote to help explain increasing complexity via evolution in simulated bio morphs.

Thanks for sharing.

By Richard Washington (not verified) on 14 Jun 2012 #permalink

It’s cool and strange at the same time.

Yes indeed.

By 'Tis Himself (not verified) on 14 Jun 2012 #permalink

He's got a fun and interesting game/hobby there. The old school Maxis games (SimCity, SimLife, ect.) weren't too dissimilar. I also recall spending many an hour writing/playing with "world generators" on my computer as a kid (ostensibly for generating supporting material for tabletop role-playing games).

Got to admire Jerry's dedication/obsessiveness.