Reproducible Research

Our friend Victoria Stodden is the lead author on a paper published today in Computing in Science and Engineering summarizing the recommendations of a roundtable we participated in at Yale on data (and code) sharing in (computational) science. Seed's Joy Moore is an additional author on the paper.

To adhere to the scientific method in the face of the transformations arising from changes in technology and the Internet, we must be able to reproduce computational results. Reproducibility will let each generation of scientists build on the previous generations' achievements.... Reproducible research is best facilitated through interlocking efforts in scientific practice, publication mechanisms, and university and funding agency policies occurring across the spectrum of computational scientific research. To ultimately succeed, however, reproducibility must be embraced at the cultural level within the computational science community. Envisioning and developing tools and policies that encourage and facilitate code and data release among individuals is a crucial step in that direction.

"Reproducible Research," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 8-13, Sep./Oct. 2010, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2010.113

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But... but... but... I thought all the fun of the computational sciences was spending months trying to translate a set of abstract formula and a poorly described algorithm into something that may or may not reproduce the figures in the paper!!!

I used to think that reproducibility is the necessity for any non-theoretic work to get published. But apparently this is far from being the common consensus in the research community. I can only predict that as time goes by, reproducible research will have a longer life expectation and everything will just follow the great law of evolution. Reproducibility will become a key attribute of not only genes but also memes - maybe it will take years or even decades for humans to recognize this. We will be there eventually!

Ãngören ve araçları ve kod ve veri kolaylaÅtırmak ve teÅvik politikaları geliÅtirilmesi, bireyler arasında bu yönde önemli bir adım sürümüdür.