Nobel to Blackburn, Greider and Szostak for Telomerase

"for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"
(from the Nobel website)

Congrats. This Nobel was one that many people expected. I don't have much time to blog about why telomerase and telomeres are so important, but I would hope that other science bloggers will step in.

Here is a link to the YouTube Nobel Prize Live Web Cast.

Some links from Jonathan A. Eisen's Blog.

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I saw the cameras outside the Nobel hall this morning on the way to work (I work across the road from the KI) and remembered it was today they announced the medicine prize. As you say Alex, this one was pretty much expected, if not this year then within the next few.
We usually get to meet the winners when they come over next month so I'll have to try to think of a good question!

Well, I am no scientist, but this is a potentially big finding, and well deserved prize. Let us just hope that it leads to further research. It would be nice to see some advancements on disease, aging (especially the brain) and most of all cancer. It is about time.