Robotic Hunting Trophies

"Hunting Trophies" is an art project designed as a sort-of protest against hunting while also raising "questionings on the relation between Human and Animal and Human and Non-Human." The aptly named French artist, France Cadet, states that she is also trying to "grant them back for a moment the right to life, to free expression and to judgment."

Well whatever she's doing, we want one for the mantle. Cyberdoll via We-Make-Money-Not-Art

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French Cadet clearly never saw the hunting lodge scene from Evil Dead 2...

More below the fold...

From Cyberdoll: The robots are able to eye the nearby person and turn their head in his direction. If we come closer the robot suddenly starts to growl and then it becomes more and more aggressive if we are too close.

When a person will walk fast facing this wall of trophies, a chain reaction will emerge such as a wave of protestation following his walk. The robots will remain calm when the room will be quiet or when people will stop moving.

Depending on the public activity the robots will be more or less active and aggressive because it is the point, showing their anger because they have been tracked, chased, killed cut up and exhibited as decorative icons.

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