Zartists Save the World, One Marmot at a Time

So you know how there aren't as many members of some species as there once was, and in fact some species that used to exist no longer exist? Well, some folks still haven't gotten the message.
In an attempt to bring more recognition (and funding) to the conservation cause, some mighty fine Zartists are collaborating on the Endangered Species Print Project. The project houses artwork that depicts endangered animals, but the print-run of each species' piece is limited to the number of individuals thought to still exist. For instance, a Zooillogix favorite: The Vancouver Island Marmot.

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... there will only be 140 prints available.

In addition to the nature-geek eye candy, viewers of the artwork are can read information about the species' present status, habitat, threats to their survival, zodiac sign, and thoughts on the dwindling economy.
Each print purchase supports a conservation effort specific to that species. The above print benefits The Marmot Recovery Foundation (I wish I owned that domain name, marmots.org, so bad), and was created by Molly Schafer.

You must check them all out: http://endangeredspeciesprintproject.com/home.html

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The URL to the prints seems broken. Can fix? Would love to see more prints! :-D

Thanks Pat. We've fixed the link, and want to give you a hardy pat on the back.

So glad to find you have an additional blog besides Zooborns. I love that blog and now I'll be checking in here.

I only recently discovered ScienceBlogs and have decided this one is my favourite...but am so disappointed at the lack of recent blogs! Please come back and keep poor Scottish folks like me entertained...

Sorry I should have said, entertained AND educated. Which is equally important.

Well ask and ye shall receive! We got really bogged down with trying to stick to our New Years resolutions. But now that we've given up leading "healthy and productive" lives, and we're back to being cheeto-eating shut ins, we have some more time to devote to Zooillogix.

Katie is right. Our New Year's resolutions have gone out the window. For example, right before I posted on our blog today, I made out with a tranny.

Huzzah! Glad you're back. And making out with trannys. And eating cheetos.

So glad to find you have an additional blog besides Zooborns
I posted on our blog today, I made out with a tranny.Which is equally important.want to give you a hardy pat on the back.

Well ask and ye shall receive! We got really bogged down with trying to stick to our New Years resolutions. But now that we've given up leading "healthy and productive" lives, and we're back to being cheeto-eating shut ins, we have some more time to devote to Zooillogix.