Sättuna Signpost

We know quite a bit more now about the archaeology of Sättuna in Kaga parish, Ãstergötland, than we did before me and my homies started fieldwork there in April of 2006. My blog readers have had news of the site as it appeared, pretty much in real time. But now it's time to put up a new signpost next to Christer's barn. Today I wrote some new text for the sign and sent it to the County Archaeologist's office. Here's the tiny English bit at the end.

The field with the barrow hides a 6500 year old Stone Age camp site and an aristocratic manor site of the 5th-9th centuries AD. Bronze jewellery was cast here and gold-foil miniatures made. Very few such manor sites are known in Ãstergötland. The barrow has not been excavated but probably dates from the 9th/10th century AD. It may be the last thing the ruling family here built before they moved. Later a 12th century royal dynasty emerged from this area.

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