My Talk At MoMath

In April I gave a presentation on the Monty Hall problem, at the Museum of Mathematics in New York. That talk has now appeared on YouTube. Here it is:

The talk is about fifty minutes, with twenty minutes of questions afterwards. There's also a short introduction by Jason Rosenfeld, who is a statistician with the National Basketball Association. I certainly won't hold it against you if you lack either the time or the interest to watch the whole thing, but you might enjoy the card trick I do starting at the ninth minute.

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Jason,

Not really on the current topic but on Sudoku and on your book, with Laura Taalman, "Taking Sudoku Seriously" which I have quite enjoyed even if I haven't quite finished it yet.

But I thought you, and others here, might be interested in a Mathematica program, available (gratis!) over at Wolfram's Demonstration Project site, that can be used to illustrate various causal sequences used in solving particular puzzles. And to boot, it even cites your book in the references. :-)

Link: http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/SudokuLogic/

By Tillerman (not verified) on 22 Jun 2016 #permalink