Religious change in the United States by state, 1990 to 2008

As a follow up to the previous post, here's some of the raw data for the ARIS. I sorted by "Nones" for 2008.

  None '90 None '08 Christian '90 Christian '08 Δ Christian Δ None
VT 13 34 84 55 -29 21
NH 9 29 85 62 -23 20
WY 14 28 74 67 -7 14
ME 11 25 85 69 -16 14
WA 15 25 79 64 -15 10
NV 14 24 80 64 -16 10
OR 18 24 77 66 -11 6
DE 7 23 85 74 -11 16
ID 13 23 84 69 -15 10
MA 8 22 83 65 -18 14
CO 13 21 81 70 -11 8
MT 11 21 86 70 -16 10
RI 6 19 88 74 -14 13
CA 14 18 78 72 -6 4
AZ 13 17 81 73 -8 4
NE 7 17 89 75 -14 10
OH 8 17 88 76 -12 9
MI 9 16 86 75 -11 7
NM 11 16 85 74 -11 5
IA 7 15 91 76 -15 8
IN 8 15 88 78 -10 7
NJ 6 15 86 72 -14 9
PA 6 15 89 77 -12 9
VA 7 15 88 76 -12 8
WI 6 15 91 76 -15 9
WV 8 15 89 77 -12 7
CT 6 14 86 74 -12 8
FL 8 14 85 76 -9 6
MO 7 14 89 79 -10 7
NY 7 14 80 71 -9 7
UT 9 14 87 78 -9 5
IL 8 13 86 77 -9 5
KY 7 13 90 80 -10 6
MD 8 13 86 76 -10 5
MN 6 12 90 80 -10 6
SD 4 12 95 78 -17 8
TX 5 12 91 80 -11 7
AL 4 11 93 86 -7 7
KS 6 11 91 82 -9 5
OK 7 11 87 80 -7 4
NC 5 10 92 82 -10 5
SC 3 10 94 83 -11 7
GA 5 9 92 81 -11 4
TN 6 9 92 83 -9 3
AR 6 8 90 87 -3 2
LA 3 8 96 88 -8 5
ND 2 7 95 90 -5 5
MS 3 5 95 91 -4 2

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Explanation? First, Minnesota has a very conservative Republican Party and a pretty liberal Democratic Party. It's actually "moderate" by now, but all this means is that the extremes are balanced. In state and Congressional politics Republicans do very well. So it's a bit of a matter of luck that the Democarts have done so well Presidentially.

Second, though, Minnesota believers mostly belong to mainline liturgical churches (Lutheran, Catholic, and Orthodox; Episcopals are the other liturgical church but aren't common in Minnesota.) America's conservative Christians belong mostly to non-liturgical fundamentalist, pentecostal, or charismatic churches od British origin. (Even Methodists and Presbyterians are not especially conservative).

By John Emerson (not verified) on 26 Jan 2010 #permalink