Some Extreme Waves Getting Bigger

The largest waves in the Pacific Northwest are getting higher by seven centimeters a year, posing an increasing threat to property close to the shore. And the strange part is: Scientists aren't sure why.

...

"Over a decadal scale, the increases in wave height ... have significant impacts on both erosion hazards and coastal flooding hazards and those currently exceed the influences of sea level rise," said Peter Ruggiero, "And they probably will over the next decade or two unless something drastic happens."

Details at wired.

More like this

There is an interesting development in the area of Aids Denialism (and by extention climate change denialism and the rest of it) in Italy: The University of Florence has launched an inquiry into the teaching activities of an academic who assisted on a course that denies the causal link between HIV…
"Flee Ike or Face Certain Death" This is what is being told to residents of Galveston Texas and surrounding areas. I don't know if that is strictly true or not, but it is close enough that you should listen. Or put it this way: If you stay, and you are wrong, those last few minutes as you are…
.... Or so goes the last sentence in the current National Hurricane Center forecast discussion.This is Gusav. Even though it is only a strong tropical storm, it looks a lot like a hurricane already. This could be a Category IV hurricane in two or three days (Gustav, Atlantic Floater 1 Visible,…
I don't have kids, but every so often, I am tempted by a children's book, and this year, I found myself fascinated by one special book, Flotsam, by David Wiesner (New York: Clarion Books, 2006). This book uses incredibly detailed watercolor paintings to depict the delightful story of a young boy…

I bet they need to look for increases in westerly wind strengths or fetches. I don't see a mere increase in sea level as affecting the amplitudes of the waves. It must be an increase in forcing.

By Bolan Meek (not verified) on 21 Dec 2008 #permalink