How Twitter can make history

While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes to report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly). The end of top-down control of news is changing the nature of politics.

Clay Shirky: Clay Shirky's consulting focuses on the rising usefulness of decentralized technologies such as peer-to-peer, wireless networks, social software and open-source development. New technologies are enabling new kinds of cooperative structures to flourish as a way of getting things done in business, science, the arts and elsewhere, as an alternative to centralized and institutional structures, which he sees as self-limiting. In his writings and speeches he has argued that "a group is its own worst enemy." His clients have included Nokia, the Library of Congress and the BBC. Shirky is an adjunct professor in New York University's graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he teaches course named "Social Weather."

More like this

47 institutions in 14 German Federal States will take part in the Open Access Week 2009. Prevention of Winter Depression Iran's science minister does science the easy way: by plagiarizing [updated] Glenn Beck and left-right confusion Getting a jump on journalism bootstrapping 'You and Your Research…
Thousands of Nokia workers walked off the job for the day in protest of the Microsoft-Nokia deal. First there was the "Burning Platform" memo: In Elop's 1300-word memo ... the ex-Microsoft exec likens the company to an oil platform burning at sea while the hands try to put out the fire by dousing…
The monthly recap of posts I liked, but you may have missed. Lotsa politics, understandably, but not all - I did manage to post some other cool stuff as well. Where are the SuperReaders when one needs them?! From Telecommuting to CoworkingBloggers at the Zoo - movies #10Offal is GoodWikipedia,…
This post from one of my favorite blogs, AfriGadget, highlights interesting ways that Africans are modifying cell phones for their unique technological needs. It is based on the author's (Erik Hersman) conversation with Jan Chipchase, a design and usability ethnographer for Nokia, who travels…