Forensics of Race

Just came across this snapshot of an exhibit panel from the Science Museum of Minnesota's exhibit on race.

SMM Race Exhibit Panel addressing the common misconception that a forensic anthropologist can look at a skull and accurately attribute "race." (photo by Greg Laden)

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Hehehe. That's why when I see reports on human remains that claim something like "white male" I just roll my eyes and groan - the "male" part is easy to determine (for adolescent and adult specimens anyway) from a good specimen of the pelvic girdle but any pronouncements of white/red/pinko/yellow/black/brown is nonsense.

By MadScientist (not verified) on 29 Jun 2012 #permalink