President Obama Opposes President Obama's Educational Policies. Or Something

A couple of weeks ago, President Obama acted like the president we hoped he would be and not the corporate donation seeking tool that he has turned into--he declared a sane educational policy in response to a question about the absurd number of standardized tests some students end up taking:

... we have piled on a lot of standardized tests on our kids. Now, there's nothing wrong with a standardized test being given occasionally just to give a baseline of where kids are at.

Malia and Sasha, my two daughters, they just recently took a standardized test. But it wasn't a high-stakes test. It wasn't a test where they had to panic. I mean, they didn't even really know that they were going to take it ahead of time. They didn't study for it, they just went ahead and took it. And it was a tool to diagnose where they were strong, where they were weak, and what the teachers needed to emphasize.

Too often what we've been doing is using these tests to punish students or to, in some cases, punish schools. And so what we've said is let's find a test that everybody agrees makes sense; let's apply it in a less pressured-packed atmosphere; let's figure out whether we have to do it every year or whether we can do it maybe every several years; and let's make sure that that's not the only way we're judging whether a school is doing well.

Because there are other criteria: What's the attendance rate? How are young people performing in terms of basic competency on projects? There are other ways of us measuring whether students are doing well or not."

Obama continued:

So what I want to do is--one thing I never want to see happen is schools that are just teaching to the test. Because then you're not learning about the world; you're not learning about different cultures, you're not learning about science, you're not learning about math. All you're learning about is how to fill out a little bubble on an exam and the little tricks that you need to do in order to take a test. And that's not going to make education interesting to you. And young people do well in stuff that they're interested in. They're not going to do as well if it's boring.

Very laudable statements, but Anthony Cody points out the slight...discrepancy between Obama's statements and his Race to the Top educational program:

Is President Obama aware:

â¢that Race to the Top requires states to tie teacher pay and evaluations to student test scores? If ever there was a recipe for teaching to the test, this is it!

â¢that his Secretary of Education is proposing to evaluate teacher preparation programs by tracking the test scores of the teachers they produce?

â¢that his administration's plan for the new version of No Child Left Behind continues to place tremendous pressure on schools attended by the poorest students, ensuring that there will still be extremely high stakes attached to these tests? This creates the most invidious inequity of all -- where students most in need of the sort of wholistic, project-based curriculum the President rightly says is the cure to boredom remain stuck in schools forced to focus on test scores.

â¢that his Department of Education is proposing greatly expanding both the number of subjects tested, and the frequency of tests, to enable us to measure the "value" each teacher adds to their students?

Given his track record to date across the board, I'm sure he's quite aware of this discrepancy, but he's just trying to burble some hopey inanities in a desperate attempt to not lose the support of teachers for the 2012 elections. I don't think he really believes what he said--Arne Duncan is his guy.

Suckas.

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Obama: "So what I want to do is--one thing I never want to see happen is schools that are just teaching to the test. Because then you're not learning about the world; you're not learning about different cultures, you're not learning about science, you're not learning about math. All you're learning about is how to fill out a little bubble on an exam and the little tricks that you need to do in order to take a test."

That's how I feel. However, I had to reconsider my view after seeing the movie, "Stand and Deliver". It definitely showed Escalante teaching to the test. At the same time, he was not just being a task master, but strongly supporting his students' future success. He turned a stumbling block, the standardized test, into a stepping stone.

But when teaching to the test becomes the means for the teacher or school to survive, that puts it in a different light, doesn't it?

that his administration's plan for the new version of No Child Left Behind continues to place tremendous pressure on schools attended by the poorest students, ensuring that there will still be extremely high stakes attached to these tests? This creates the most invidious inequity of all -- where students most in need of the sort of wholistic, project-based curriculum the President rightly says is the cure to boredom remain stuck in schools forced to focus on test scores.

Unfortunately Obama the rhetorician and Obama the President are two different men. We elected the former, but got the later.

And yes, we were "Suckah"s...