Yet Another Compelling Reason Not to Work So Hard

"We saw that the group with high level of leisure activities presented 38% less risk of developing Alzheimer's symptoms."

Dr. Yaakov Stern, Professor of Clinical Neuropsychology, at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York.

Read this interview with Dr. Stern on Sharp Brains, to learn more about building up your "cognitive reserves."

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Thats probably predictable, they have little to tax their brains. Anyway, I'm a lazybone and its good news for me 38% of the time.