Botanical Wednesday: Finally, a flower for atheists

But wouldn't you know it, it's an endangered species. If it weren't for that, I'd happily wear Telipogon diabolicus on my lapel everywhere.

Telipogon-diabolicus

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You’re saying “FOR ATHEISTS”
because the flower has been given the name
“DEVIL'S head”?

Why?

By See Noevo (not verified) on 13 Jul 2016 #permalink

@sn: Religious people often report seeing religious iconography, e.g. Jesus, the virgin Mary, or a cross, in essentially random phenomena, e.g. pieces of toast, wood grain, vegetables, clouds, or shadows. It's a form of optical illusion called pareidolia. If the appearance of something holy is considered a miracle from a god, then what should we make of the appearance of something unholy?

This video spoofs the idea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8-8WJxA-cI

Actually I think the flower resembles a bee or a fly, and like several other orchids has probably evolved to attract them by mimicking a potential mate.

By Wizard Suth (not verified) on 14 Jul 2016 #permalink