What Every Dog Should Know About Quantum Physics

I gave a talk today for a group of local home-school students and parents, on the essential elements of quantum physics. The idea was to give them a sense of what sets quantum mechanics apart from other theories of physics, and why it's a weird and wonderful thing.

The title is, of course, a reference to How to Teach Physics to Your Dog, and the second slide was an embedded version of the Chapter 3 reading. I set the talk up to build toward the double-slit experiment with electrons, using the video of the experiment made by Hitachi. Here's the talk on SlideShare:

It went really well, I think. There were thirty-ish students and parents there, and a number of the kids were really fired up about it. After the talk, I brought Emmy in to meet them, and then gave them a tour of a couple of labs and the college observatory, which was also a big hit. Several of them also brought books to be signed, and were really enthusiastic about the book, which is a kick.

I've exchanged some emails with a local high school teacher, and will probably try to set something similar up with them for later in the year. We'll see. For now, this was a lot of fun, and I hope it was helpful to the students and parents in attendance.

Update: A post at the Home Physics blog, with a couple of pictures showing the talk in progress, and part of the tour.

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