Tesla Coil, Center Stage

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Below, Edward Einhorn answers our final question.


Writing theater about science, in general, has become somewhat more popular, thanks partly (but by no means wholly) on the fact that technology has slowly become a more integral part of theater. This is especially true in small, independent theaters where the technology is not just there to support the work but, in a way, take center stage.  This fascination ranges from modern technology, such as in the work of the group 3LD, which uses advance projection technology in every show, to technology of a definitely less modern sort—the Collective Unconscious, another small theater company, owns a huge Tesla coil which has been featured prominently in countless productions.

I think theater and science are natural partners. It is through the synthesis of art and science that breakthroughs in both are found, so I can't think of any instance it can't be appropriate. There are certain plays, of course, that lend themselves to the incorporation of science more than others.

â¨So putting the Tesla coil in the middle of The Cherry Orchard might be inappropriate. Then again, it might not be. What's the concept?

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