The Buzz: The Third-Generation Genome

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A recent paper in Nature Biotechnology reported the first complete human genome to be sequenced using third-generation, single-molecule sequencing technology. The genome sequenced belongs to one Stephen Quake, co-founder of the biotech company Helicos that developed the Heliscope instrument used to perform the analysis. On Genetic Future, ScienceBlogger Dan MacArthur analyzes the paper itself, explaining that while single-molecule sequencing is undoubtedly the direction in which genome analysis is headed, the technology is not yet on par with second-generation sequencing platforms in terms of error rate and extent of coverage. Dan also questions Helicos's claim that their technology allows significant cost-cutting, and points to some more general sources of information on next-generation genome sequencing.

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