Another lovely sunset

20161211_160144

20161211_162036

It's just my phone camera, so don't look too closely.

Refs

* Why We Support a Revenue-Neutral Carbon Tax by George Shultz & Gary Becker - April 8, 2013.

More like this

InsideClimateNews (who I've been unimpressed with before) via Brian at Eli's tell us that Exxon may claim to favour a carbon tax, but aren't exactly enthusiastic about it. Because someone else was saying it, my natural initial reaction was to disagree; but having poked their sources a bit, it looks…
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Julia Gillard has done a backflip and agreed to introduce a budget-neutral carbon tax after last year promising not to introduce one. In a matching backflip John Humphreys has come out against the tax, describing it as a "grab for cash" after writing a report in 2007 that favoured a carbon tax: Our…
Everyone is being terribly cwuel to Exxon, and they feel the need to respond. You can probably chalk that up as a success, though a minor one. On the ultimate substance I don't feel any need to revise my previous posts: that Exxon's climate science research was far less interesting than the…

A revenue neutral carbon tax is a good thing. Not the end of policy, but a good start.

By Phil Hays (not verified) on 11 Dec 2016 #permalink

I'm never sure what these revenue neutral carbon taxes are supposed to mean. Without an actual rate they are meaningless. By most calculations of the SCC, and assuming that's even the guideline, most of Europe would see a large *reduction* in their gasoline taxes. In the USA a small increase.

For other fuels it's much more difficult to determine the *average* USA tax structure. Severance taxes usually amount to a few percent. See, for instance, Oil and Gas Severance Taxes

Tell me your SCC and your discount rate, then we have some idea of what's being proposed. Otherwise it's just a bunch of kumbaya -- and impossible to analyze.

[I find the rate less interesting than the idea, because the rate will inevitably change. Most people - that piece included - think ramping it up a good diea. You can have Hansen's rate if you like: https://citizensclimatelobby.org/basics-carbon-fee-dividend/ -W]

By Kevin O'Neill (not verified) on 11 Dec 2016 #permalink

yes, driving along the Madingley Road this evening, about 3.45pm

absolutely stunning

[A local! -W]

yes, Bourn

and as you say a simply stunning sunset - photos rarely do it justice

looks like Kings College, - Cambridge is a very photogenic city - my wife and I were at Jesus College only last night to celebrate the Choir Masters last evensong - my eldest son was a chorister for 6 odd years

I often remarked as I walked him to Chapel "Orlando - this is what first prize looks like, one day I will take you to Sussex Uni and show you what third looks like"

Don't all come crowding over here but we have many on many such sunsets throughout Autumn and often springtime as well.

No King's College. You'd have to put up with Brian Hall clock tower...

By David B. Benson (not verified) on 11 Dec 2016 #permalink

Lived off Madingley Road during Dad's sabbatical at Churchill (was it 1961?). These pictures make me long to be there. Thanks.

We went to carols at King's College Chapel - it was about -5 (C) and unheated but as the ribs faded in the twilight it was heavenly!

By Susan Anderson (not verified) on 11 Dec 2016 #permalink

@ Susan, they have done a lot of work there recently

and actually just up from Churchill's is the American War Cemetery (recently revamped), which is incredibly moving

Lived off Madingley Road during Dad’s sabbatical at Churchill (was it 1961?).

Perfect timing- he got to know Ashby , and you missed Monckton!

Seems that the likely fishing boundries combined with a bit of climate change will mean that most of the catch for the former Great Britain will be squid, by 2025 or so.

Calamari and chips, the new national dish for Little England.

"Essentially, once the post-Brexit bunfight over sea territories has subsided, it feels to me likely that Britain’s little patch of watery turf, which we must ransack daily to support ourselves, is likely to be Squid City. It’s perfectly agreeable, incidentally, fresh and sliced thinly, wrapped in a light, crisp batter and served with a punchy, homemade aioli and nice bottle of Picpoul de Pinet. But I’m not helping, am I?"

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-leavers-52-per-cent-cod-and-…

By Phil Hays (not verified) on 13 Dec 2016 #permalink

'Calamari and chips, the new national dish for Little England.'

Replacing farmed salmon & chips, the Minke whales having gobbled the remaining cod.

C+C was the national dish for decades because it was cheap and plentiful. These days a small cod & chips will set you back $8-9; it's no longer a viable family option for the UK's average wage earners.
Besides, everyone knows that the national dish has been Tandoori Chicken & pilau rice for a wile now, though with the influence of 'Bake-off' I suspect it has now moved to Cup Cakes. They're ubiquitous...

By Fergus Brown (not verified) on 14 Dec 2016 #permalink

Looking at scrapbooks, came across one Duncan Haldane, graduate student, and some pix of Thouless. What it is to be PWA! He just turned 93.

By Susan Anderson (not verified) on 14 Dec 2016 #permalink