Tet Zoo picture of the day # 6

i-c87eba08bc4e9e27b20eba41e7d93400-giraffa skull.jpg

The amazing skull of a giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis, courtesy of Mark Witton. This presumably wasn't an old individual (you can clearly see the sutures of most of its bones), nor does it have the enlarged ossicones and general gnarliness of mature males. The specimen also has a low median hump; in mature males this is generally taller and more like a short horn. Note how shockingly gracile and stretched the premaxillae and dentaries are. For a previous Tet Zoo post on giraffes go here. Proper post hopefully coming later today (though not on giraffes).

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