Toxins in Our Food: This Month's Alternative Sponsor at The World's Fair

Our alternative sponsor for November (arriving very late in the month) is a Tom Meyer cartoon.

i-8891308b1d82b81c8e6dcc8942f4b341-T.Meyer.1986.jpg

(by Tom Meyer, SF Chronicle cartoonist, as reprinted in Ann Vileisis's Kitchen Literacy, p. 213)

We offer this, as always, to call attention to favorite Sb sponsor Dow Chemical (though I haven't seen the Dow ads for a while -- then again, I haven't been here for a while). It seems that a crew testing Michigan's Saginaw River recently found dioxin contaminations from Dow in amounts heretofore unheard of ("about 20 times higher than any other find recorded in the archives of the U.S. environmental agency"). Dioxin gets in water, water is in food, food goes in us. Upton Sinclair's concerns for adulterated food of the industrial age must seem tame by comparison to what we've been able to accomplish in the time since. (At the same time, readers might be interested to here that Dow disputes the levels found in that testing. I am shocked, just shocked.)

So to our vaunted roster of alternative sponsors, we add this vision of the contents of our food supplies and, as connected, the pollutants in our riverways and watershed.

And don't forget to visit our other sponsors -- the Grand Hotel Regina, Kaspar Schott's "How to Determine Depth of a Well," Bell Telephone, Encyclopedia Britannica, Cutter Bill, Hungarian cookbooks, and Fellman Shoes. They want to bring you high quality blogging too!

More like this

For a year or so, we had the privilege at the World's Fair to garner our own sponsors, corporate and otherwise, so as not to rely on money from Dow Chemical or Shell, money that Seed Media Group was all too willing to take. In the end, we had nine separate alternative sponsors, each coming with its…
A week after a major report found widespread Bush Administration political interference with science in the EPA, the Chicago Tribune reported late this week that the Administration has forced the resignation of Mary Gade, head of the EPA's Midwest office: SAGINAW, Mich. - The battle over dioxin…
Last year we posted a notice of the highest measurement of dioxin ever recorded by the EPA. The reading was from the Tittabawassee River in Michigan, downstream from Dow Chemical's headquarters in Midland and on its way to Lake Huron (see map below). Michigan state safe levels are set at 90 ppt…
The Chicago Tribune has just reported that Mary Gade, the Bush administrationâs top environmental regulator in the Midwest, has been forced to quit her job after months of efforts to get Dow Chemicals to clean up dioxin contamination around its Michigan headquarters. The Tribuneâs Michael Hawthorne…