You're ugly, but I like your kids anyway

Mother Birds Give A Nutritional Leg Up To Chicks With Unattractive Fathers:

Mother birds deposit variable amounts of antioxidants into egg yolks, and it has long been theorized that females invest more in offspring sired by better quality males. However, a study from the November/December 2006 issue of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology shows that even ugly birds get their day. Providing new insight into the strategic basis behind resource allocation in eggs, the researchers found that female house finches deposit significantly more antioxidants, which protect the embryo during the developmental process, into eggs sired by less attractive fathers.

It's moved from sex steroids to antioxidants, I see. Can someone please send me this paper so I can comment more fully?

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