More on Antioxidants

I see that I was the only one answering this week's Ask The ScienceBlogger question (so far). Perhaps these two new studies will inspire some of my SciBlings to add their own thoughts:

Everybody Dance: The Energy You Use Won't Shorten Your Life:

The theory that animals die when they've expended their lifetime allotment of energy may be reaching the end of its own life, according to a study presented at The American Physiological Society conference, Comparative Physiology 2006. However, the longitudinal study leaves open a newer form of the theory -- that antioxidants help prolong life by limiting the damage that oxidative stress can cause to cells.

Naked Mole-Rat Unfazed By Oxidative Stress:

The long-lived naked mole-rat shows much higher levels of oxidative stress and damage and less robust repair mechanisms than the short-lived mouse, findings that could change the oxidative stress theory of aging.

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