Circadian Biology in PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE has already published a large number of papers in chronobiology. But we want more. Hey, I work there - I want to see more.

So, when I went to the SRBR meeting in May, I did whatever I could to explain how PLoS ONE works and why my colleagues in the field should consider publishing with PLoS.

One thing we neeeded to give potential authors confidence is to add more chronobiologists to our Editorial Board in order to ensure that their mansucripts will be handled (and thus reviewed) by the experts in the field.

So, I am very happy to announce that we have secured editorial services of three excellent chronobiologists: Shin Yamazaki of Vanderbilt University, Michael N. Nitabach of Yale and Paul A. Bartell of Penn State. They WILL understand what your manuscript is all about, I promise ;-)

So, if you have a manuscript in the works, consider PLoS ONE and join the revolution in publishing!

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Great news! I have some interesting photoperiodism results that I am working on writing up. It's not circadian biology, but it is chronobiology. I will add PLOS to the list of potential outlets for my work.

Long live chronobiology!