Columbia Scholarly Communication Program Speaker Series Videos Now Available Online

Check them out here (unfortunately, no embed codes, so you'll have to click and watch there, or download on iTunes):

Know Your Rights: Who Really Owns Your Scholarly Works?:

In this panel discussion, experts on copyright law and scholarly publishing discuss how scholars and researchers can take full advantage of opportunities afforded by digital technology in today's legal environment, and suggest ways to advocate for positive change. The panelists are Heather Joseph, who has been Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Michael Carroll, Visiting Professor of Law at American University's Washington College of Law and a founding member of the Board of Directors of Creative Commons; and Director of the Columbia University Copyright Advisory Office Kenneth Crews, whose research focuses on copyright issues, particularly as they relate to the needs of scholarship at the university.

Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet:

Today's research and scholarship is data- and information-intensive, distributed, interdisciplinary, and collaborative. However, the scholarly practices, products, and sources of data vary widely between disciplines. Some fields are more advantaged than others by the array of content now online and by the tools and services available to make use of that content. UCLA Professor of Information Studies Christine Borgman provides an overview of new developments in scholarly information infrastructure, including policy issues such as open access and intellectual property, and addresses the implications of e-science for cyberlearning. Borgman is the author of more than 180 publications in the fields of information studies, computer science, and communication, including two widely praised books on digital technology and scholarship. She is a lead investigator for the Center for Embedded Networked Systems (CENS) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and chaired the NSF's Task Force on Cyberlearning.

Open Science: Good For Research, Good For Researchers?:

Open science refers to information-sharing among researchers and encompasses a number of initiatives to remove access barriers to data and published papers, and to use digital technology to more efficiently disseminate research results. Advocates for this approach argue that openly sharing information among researchers is fundamental to good science, speeds the progress of research, and increases recognition of researchers. Panelists: Jean-Claude Bradley, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Coordinator of E-Learning for the School of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University; Barry Canton, founder of Gingko BioWorks and the OpenWetWare wiki, an online community of life science researchers committed to open science that has over 5,300 users; Bora Zivkovic, Online Discussion Expert for the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and author of "A Blog Around the Clock."

Future of the Book: Can the Endangered Monograph Survive?:

Panelists Helen Tartar, Editorial Director at Fordham University Press; Sanford Thatcher, Director of Penn State University Press and past President of the Association of American University Presses; and Ree DeDonato, Director of Humanities and History and Acting Director of Union Theological Seminary's Burke Library of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services discuss the economics and process of scholarly publishing and the future of the monograph. Columbia's Deputy University Librarian and Associate Vice President for Digital Programs and Technology Services Patricia Renfro introduces the panel, which is followed by a question-and-answer session.

Final Impact: What Factors Really Matter?:

A panel discussion on the debate about the best way to rank the importance and influence of scholarly publications. Panelists: Marian Hollingsworth, director of Publisher Relations at Thomson Reuters and former assistant director of the National Federation of Abstracting and Information Services; Jevin West, an Achievement Awards for College Scientists Fellow at the University of Washington's Biology Department and head developer for Eigenfactor.org; and Johan Bollen, a staff researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the principal investigator of the MESUR project. Columbia University Librarian Jim Neal introduces the talk.

The Harvard Open Access Initiatives:

Stuart Shieber, James O. Welch, Jr. and Virginia B. Welch Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Office for Scholarly Communication at Harvard University, discusses open access at Harvard. Columbia University Librarian James Neal introduces the talk and a question-and-answer session follows.

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