Darwin Across the Disciplines

At Duke University John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute:

Thursday, November 5th, 2009 at 4:00 pm

In collaboration with the Office of the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies and Duke's University Institutes, the FHI is pleased to present a 2-day symposium marking the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of The Origins of Species. The core idea of the symposium is to mark these dual anniversaries by discussing Darwin's work (its impacts, legacies, etc) from a range of disciplinary perspectives crossing the sciences, humanities, arts, and social sciences, and to use that opportunity as an occasion for thinking about the kinds of knowledge projects and practices that can emerge when we traffic those disciplinary divides. A complete program schedule is available here.

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