Reduced heart function with low oxygen

"Drosophila melanogaster - side (aka)" by André Karwath aka Aka - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Drosophila_melanogaster_-_side_(aka).jpg#/media/File:Drosophila_melanogaster_-_side_(aka).jpg
"Drosophila melanogaster - side (aka)" by André Karwath aka Aka - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons -

 

Researchers at the University of California at San Diego were interested in understanding how exposure to low oxygen concentrations impact heart function. For humans low oxygen delivery to the heart can occur with exposure to high altitude, respiratory diseases, inflammation, blood clots and during a heart attack when there is inadequate blood flow to the heart muscle. The results of their study were recently published in the American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 

The team exposed fruit flies (aka: Drosophila melanogaster) to low oxygen conditions consisting of 1-4% oxygen(hypoxia) for 30 minutes, 18 hours or 3 weeks and then returned the flies to normal atmospheric oxygen (21% oxygen). They found that flies exposed for 18 hours or 3 weeks had impaired heart function after the flies were returned to normal atmospheric oxygen. In contrast, animals exposed to acute hypoxia (3 hours) maintained normal function.

When they raised Drosphila in low oxygen conditions for 250 generations, they found that the offspring not only had altered heart function evidenced by reduced heart rate and contractility, their hearts were also smaller and the muscle fibers disorganized compared to generations of animals raised in normal oxygen conditions. These findings suggest that chronic hypoxia alters the development of the heart at the genetic level.

Source:

, , , , , . Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

More like this

Image of chicken egg from Wikimedia Commons. Turns out the egg is an important phase. A new study published this month in American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology looked at what happens in the egg when a chicken fetus was exposed to low oxygen (hypoxia…
...in alligators at least. Image of alligator eggs and hatchling from National Park Service. Researchers from the University of Manchester, University of North Texas - Denton, and the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge - Grand Chenier, Louisiana teamed up to explore the effects of exposure to low…
Image by Botaurus - Wikimedia commons A changing climate has the potential to greatly impact ectotherms, which depend on the environment to regulate their own body temperatures. In a new study published in the American Journal of Physiology- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology,…
I love fish. The diversity of these aquatic creatures is so vast, I find them fascinating. Take the eel for example: Image of a Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) by opencage, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14520151 In a study published this month in the American…