Friday Beetle Blogging: Dineutes Whirligig

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Dineutes sublineatus - whirligig beetle
Arizona, USA

Whirligigs are masters of the thin interface between air and water, predating on animals caught in the surface tension.   In the field it can be hard to appreciate the finely sculptured details of their bodies, the erratic movements that give them their name also make them hard to observe and to catch.

photo details: Canon 100mm f2.8  macro lens on a Canon 20D
f/18, 1/250 sec, ISO 100

Beetles in a 5-gallon  aquarium with a colored posterboard for backdrop.

Off-camera flash bounced off white paper.

Levels adjusted in Photoshop.

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