Old-school medical wonders, from London Museum

Below, the "jugum penis," designed to prevent "nocturnal lincontinence" (aka masturbation). One of many wonders in a new London Science Museum online exhibit of historical medical objects called "Brought to Life," as featured in this New Scientist photo essay.

Don't try these at home.

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AHHH!
I'm not even sure I want to know how these things work. It may prevent nocturnal lincontinence but probably was the source of many nightmares! Cool post, though.

Did they borrow this from the Wellcome Collection at Euston Square? The Wellcome Trust has a fantastic array of medical curiosities, including one of these. Well worth checking out.