Lightspeed Magazine: Sci Fi and Reality collide

There's a slick new online Sci Fi rag called Lightspeed. I like this one because they also publish nonfiction pieces that are relevant to their fiction stories. Ok I'm a bit biased because they asked me to write a nonfiction piece for them. In the same issue there was a story called Manumission by Tobias Buckell, which used intentionally created memory loss as a plot device for a story that is part noir, part Heinlein, and all funky fun. My piece loosely relates to the story, but explores a bit more of what memory loss means for an individual's perception of themselves.

Do drop by and read both, and explore the webzine. It's pretty entertaining stuff from fresh faces and old standbys in Sci Fi/Fantasy.

More about Lightspeed, from their About page:

Lightspeed is an online magazine focusing exclusively on science fiction. Here you can expect to see all types of science fiction, from near-future, sociological soft sf, to far-future, star-spanning hard sf, and anything and everything in between. No subject will be considered off-limits, and we encourage our writers to take chances with their fiction and push the envelope.

Each month at Lightspeed, we bring you a mix of originals and reprints, and featuring a variety of authors--from the bestsellers and award-winners you already know to the best new voices you haven't heard of yet. When you read Lightspeed, it is our hope that you'll see where science fiction comes from, where it is now, and where it's going.

Lightspeed also features a variety of nonfiction features, fiction podcasts, and Q&As with our authors that go behind-the-scenes of their stories.

Our regular publication schedule each month includes two pieces of original fiction and two fiction reprints, along with four nonfiction articles. New content (Fiction and Nonfiction) will be posted on the first four Tuesdays of each month. Ebook editions and editorials will be available on the 1st of the month.

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Robert White, MD

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Lightspeed also features a variety of nonfiction features, fiction podcasts, and Q&As with our authors that go behind-the-scenes of their stories.

richarddawkins.net/discussions/543672-inhertitance-of-acquired-behaviour-adaptions-and-brain-gene-expression-in-chickens

atheists, we're gonna cut off your heads...

THE HIGH PRICE OF REVOLUTION
youtube.com/user/xviolatex?feature=mhum

I mean, really?? I'm a scientist, and just reading that even made *my* eyes glaze over. If one thing they're trying to convey is the importance and relevance of the scientist's research to GQ readers, what percentage of the readers are really going to walk away with a deeper understanding of what Dr. Jamieson does by reading that description? It would have been a small thing to ask each participant to submit a layman-friendly version of their research (their "elevator talk" description, for example) for GQ to include.

Finally--one of the "scientists" is Dr. Oz. What is he doing in there? One, I would think he's already well-known enough; why not save that spot for another scientist? Two, yes, I know he's actually done research and published, and is on the faculty at Columbia. Fantastic. He's also a serious woo peddler, who has even featured everyone's favorite "alternative" doc, Joseph Mercola, on his talk show, and discussed how vaccines may be playing a role in autism and allergies (despite mounds of evidence to the contrary). This seems to completely contradict their goal of "research funding as a national priority," since Oz is often (and Mercola is always) highly critical of "mainstream medicine." I really don't understand his inclusion, and think it's to the detriment of the rest of the campaign.

Great writing Evil Monkey and team - you always get a good chuckle from me! In my work in Meditation I explore the human mind and ways neuroscience can aid in research on this, hope to see some articles on it soon!
Keep up the great work

This is an interesting post about Lighthead magazine. I never heard of it before but thanks to you, I was able to know what the magazine is all about. So it's not all SciFi, but also fantasy. Hmm.. great job!

Bu tamamen onların hedefi "finansman araÅtırma, ulusal bir öncelik olarak" ters görünüyor Oz sık sık (ve Mercola her zaman çünkü) son derece kritik tıbbın"mainstream." Gerçekten yok onun dahil anlamak ve kampanya geri kalanı zararına olduÄunu düÅünüyorum.