What to Tell Your Dog About Einstein

"Hey, dude, whatcha doin'?"

"Signing these contracts. I'm not sure why they need four copies, but they do."

i-c0a61ce49954d99739f8aa64636d2c22-sm_book2_contract.jpg

"Contracts for what?"

"The new book. Remmeber, the one we've been talking about these last few weeks? Sequel-of-sorts to How to Teach Physics to Your Dog? About relativity?"

"Oh, yeah, that's right! We're doing another book! Where do I sign?"

"What do you mean, 'Where do I sign?' You're a dog."

"I could, you know, put a paw print on the line, or something."

"I suppose you could, but it wouldn't be legally binding. Dogs aren't allowed to sign contracts."

"You know that's horribly species-ist, right? I suppose you're going to get all the money, too."

"Well, yeah, since dogs can't open bank accounts, either. But don't worry, you'll get your share."

"In the form of steak?"

"Absolutely."

"Yippee! I love steak!"

Silliness aside, here's the big news I've been sitting on for a while: I have a deal to do a second talking-to-the-dog-about-physics book, tentatively titled How to Teach Relativity to Your Dog, though I kind of like the title I used for this post. This will be the same basic format, with dog dialogues about physics followed by longer explanations of the theory, with occasional interruptions from Emmy. I've got very rough drafts of the first few chapters already, and most of the rest of it mapped out.

(We agreed to the terms of the deal a few weeks ago, but I'm just paranoid enough to not want to announce it here until I had signed the contracts.)

In some ways, this will be easier than the first book, because I've gone through the process once already and have a better idea of what to expect. In other ways, it will be more difficult, because the subject isn't quite as close to my own areas of expertise (though I have taught relativity in modern physics classes on several occasions). Also, it's going to be a bit of a challenge to fit everything in-- when I did the first one, I was on sabbatical for most of the writing, and we didn't have SteelyKid yet. I'll be teaching a normal load this year, and dealing with an energetic and inquisitive toddler at the same time, so it's going to be a little tricky to block out writing time.

This will probably require a significant reduction in blogging, starting next week, but we'll see how that goes. I'm not going to commit myself to any particular schedule at this time, though.

If you're wondering about details of the deal, the new book will be published by Basic Books, who publish quite a few science books, and is planned to be a trade paper original. The manuscript is due next April 15, and the finished book will be out some time after that, the specific date depending on details of the production and marketing process.

Emmy and I are, obviously, pretty psyched about this. I will undoubtedly be learning a great deal more about relativity in the months ahead, some of which will surely make it onto the blog.

There's also a UK edition of our first book, How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog, due out in October, plus several other languages (Chinese should be out soon, but I have no idea how to search for it), and some other possible projects in the works, so it's a fun time for dog physics.

More like this

I'm checking a last few things and putting papers into an envelope when the dog wakes up from her nap. "Hey," she says, stretching, "What're you doing?" "I'm getting ready to mail this," I say. "What is it?" "Several copies of a book contract that I just signed." "It's a book about me, right?" she…
It's now officially February, and the release date for How to Teach Relativity to Your Dog is only a few weeks off-- the official release date is Feb. 28. Of course, I've got a copy already: If you would like a copy of your very own, you can either wait until the release, or take part in this…
Three quick items relating to science in book form: 1) It's that time of year again when every media outlet of any consequence puts out a "Year's Best {Noun}" list, and John Dupuis is checking the lists for science books so you don't have to. It looks like a pretty reasonable year for science in…
Another dramatic reading of a chapter from How to Teach Physics to Your Dog, just because. This is Chapter 4, which is based on the original Many Worlds, Many Treats post that kick-started the whole thing: I'm sitting at the computer typing, when Emmy bumps up against my legs. I look down, and she…

Woohoo! Ahem. I meant to say congratulations to you and your co-author.

By David Owen-Cruise (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

Congratulations!

Looking forward to reading this.

By Michael I (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

Congratulations!

*Doing the happy dance*

Congratulations! My sons (13, 15, and 16 yo) all loved HTTPTYD, as did I. We'll definitely be pre-ordering this one too.

By Eric Johnson (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

Congratulations! Looking forward to it!

Congratulations! One has to wonder what will happen if Emmy, by all accounts a bright and inquisitive dog, starts asking questions about particle physics and cosmology...

What to tell your dog about Einstein. Definitely much better.

By Roy Macarthur (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

Way to go, Chad and Emmy! You do us proud!

By Aunt Marie &am… (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

The other week, after recommending it to a student, I thought I should probably read your first book to check it was as good as I said it probably was. Then I went on Amazon and it turned out I had already preordered it (I'm a UKadian) months ago. I'm looking forward to it arriving.

Excellent. As long as "relativistic mass" never appears ...

By CCPhysicist (not verified) on 02 Sep 2010 #permalink

Congratulations! Though I'm still looking forward to the UK edition of the original book.