The Exotic Physics of an Ordinary Morning

A couple of weeks ago, I gave a talk at TEDxAlbany on how quantum physics manifests in everyday life. I posted the approximate text back then, but TEDx has now put up the video:

So, if you've been wondering what it sounded like live, well, now you can see...

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That is a clear and entertaining talk you gave regarding quantum physics in everyday life. I will certainly be sharing the video with a few of my friends who have expressed an interest in quantum physics. Thanks.

By Phil Seymour (not verified) on 22 Dec 2015 #permalink

Frankly and personally, I don't like the way QM is always hyped as being "very very weird", dealing with "zombie cats" and being "yes" or "no" or "here" or "there" at the same time.

Sounds like physics on the market stand for laymen. Needs an adblocker, haha.

Why don't we claim that classical mechanics is nearly as or even more weird? - we are just used to it. But what about relativity? Special and in general? For the most people likewise hard to digest, I assume - not the convenient mathematics but the, let's say, 'weird' philosophical impacts.

Btw. Did not have the superposition of all the "cat wavefunctions" obviously already "collapsed" to a little kitten at the very beginning of the experiment? What did we put into the box? During the experiment we just have a coin in a rattling box. Just open the box it's no there is to it.