The Hidden Towers of Nevada

Thanks to the Deputy Dog blog for unveiling these awesome hidden towers of Nevada:

i-8fc9a0ba8c3142a300f477c921c46059-tower.jpg

Although they look like retro-futurist prefab apartments, the structures are actually the water intake towers for the Hoover Dam's hydro-electric power station. The images were taken during the construction of the dam, and the towers are now mostly submerged in water. See the Deputy Dog blog for more images.

More like this

The Nile River – river of legend – is not just a river in Egypt. It is the lifeblood of 11 different African nations and the longest river in the world, extending over 6,500 kilometers long and draining a watershed of over 3 million square kilometers. The eleven nations that share the Nile are…
Edge of Loch, ScotlandJason Hawkes Phoographer Jason Hawkes specializes in aerial views that emphasize patterns in nature and manmade structures. While his Apartments, Hong Kong first caught my eye at io9, Edge of Loch, Scotland plays even more fascinating games with scale. Is that a closeup of a…
Carolynn Dejaynes had visited the tunnel at the Xcel Energy's Cabin Creek hydro-electric plant the day before it claimed her husband's life and that of four other employees of Robison-Prezioso Inc. (RPI).  Mrs. Dejaynes says: "It shouldn't have happened.  There were things that could have…
Ana's Feeed starting Sunday mid day through last night: TEPCO press conf. (NHK): Since the accident, we have caused a huge amount of trouble and inconvenience to residents and anxiety to the greater population in general ... Residents have been asked to evacuate and they would like to return home…

"The images were taken during the construction of the dam, and the towers are now mostly submerged in water."

Of course, each year this gets closer to becoming false. I remember when I was a kid going to the dam and the water was only a few feet below the walkways that connect the towers. I remember a few years later being in a boat against one of the rock faces and the line between normal rock and "bleached" rock that marked the highest point of the lake was close enough to touch. Now the surface is 50+ feet lower from that line and about a third of the "underwater" portion of those towers no longer is.