Lego My Scientist

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Alan Saunders, a.k.a. Kaptain Kobold, is a 42-year-old computer programmer and former biology student from Staines, England. He uses Lego blocks to depict famous scientists at work.

"I have no idea why I started making Lego scientist scenes," says Saunders, who's married with two children, one cat, two guinea pigs, "and couple of cockroaches." His children like the scientist figures, though they have no idea yet who they are.

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At top right, Gregor Mendel cultivates his pea plants. Next, Charles Darwin stands in a "family portrait" with a yellow Neanderthal, an angry-faced Lucy, and an Old World monkey. Why Darwin? Because Saunders loves evolutionary biology. "That, and the fact that I had a monkey and a big white beard."

His Lego vignettes pay tribute to the occasional non-scientist, too. Below is Kent Hovind, preacher, creationist, and tax evader.

See Saunders' entire Flickr set of Lego photos, or read his blog.

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