Who needs males?

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Apparently Mycocepurus smithii doesn't. It has become the first ant species to dispense completely with males. More details here.

(The picture above - from the Daily Mail story - is actually by Alex Wild but is unattributed)

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Hi John. Thanks for pointing that photo out- I'll have to contact the Daily Mail. A lot of media outlets don't seem to realize that they can't just use any picture off the internet.