There Once Was A....

Once again, there are three new pieces online on our website, each wonderful in its own way. But Haiku just didn’t seem to fit this batch. So, with apologies to the scientists, here are three limericks on the newest Institute research. As before, follow the links to get to our website.

(Incidentally, there is some precedent for limerick writing at the Weizmann Institute. The late Prof. Amikam Aharoni, who also wrote some serious stuff on ferromagnetism, was known for his limericks.)

 

The Quasar

There once was a baby black hole

That went for a short little stroll

It zigged and it zagged

Appetite never lagged

Til it’d swallowed its neighborhood whole

 

Klajn_nanocube

 

Nanostrings Attached

To make a string out of cubes

Don’t reach for those long nanotubes

To twist like a screw

Only one shape will do

Those nano-self-assembling cubes

 

The Stem Cell’s Story

What, oh what, will I be tonight?

A red blood cell, or maybe a white?

Though I’m bound for the red

I’ll stop just ahead

And turn into a nice lymphocyte

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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