The Periodic Table of Wine

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Another clever use of the periodic table in design: Washington State's Wines of Substance, who won Seattle Magazine's "Coolest Wine Label" Award in 2008.

According to Substance, "wine is as much an art as it is a science. What better way to express this basis than a Periodic Table of Wine with each varietal reflected as an element or substance?" Their interactive "periodic table" website is hardly scientific, but it does look pretty awesome:

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In addition to looking all sciencetastic, Substance sponsors selected nonprofits - in January, 25% of all purchases go to Helpline Women's Shelter. So check out their selection. (Unfortunately, if you live in a state that doesn't allow wine shipments (boo!) you can't order from Substance - or anyone else.)

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I would say wine tasting was WAY more art than science. The whole dubious mystique surrounding it, the incredible subjectiveness, the almost poetic descriptions. Although I think this website is really swish, I don't think turning wine tasting into a 'science' is going to do anyone any favours. It is an art, and should be enjoyed and appreciated as such :)

Also drinking out of a beaker would just feel ... wrong ...