See you at the SRBR meeting!

i-3fa229f91a63e9b8920afbda1ff285a0-SRBR08splash.gif
The 11th Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms will be held in Sandestin, FL on May 17th-21st, 2008. And I'll be there. This meeting occurs every two years (on even-numbered years, the International Congress and the Gordon Conference are in odd-numbered years). I attended three or four of these when it was down on Amelia Island, FL. Then I skipped the one in Whistler, Canada, four years ago as I had no money to go, and the one in Sandestin two years ago as I was out of science. But I'll be going back - with a mission: to explain Open Access to my colleagues, to get them to publish with PLoS, to get them to read my blog, to catch up with my field and to do some blog-interviews with the interesting people there. So, if you are chronobiologist and you'll be there, please find me and say Hi.

More like this

Vertebrates are modified segmented worms; that is, their body plan is made up of sequentially repeated units, most apparent in skeletal structures like the vertebrae. Arthropods are also modified segmented worms. Look at a larval fly, for instance, and you can see they are made up of rings stacked…
My spring traveling schedule has now crystallized. This is my schedule - if you are in any of those places at just the right time, let me know and let's meet. I'll be arriving in London on April 9 early in the morning. I'd like to have a huge bloggers' meetup that first night, if possible, as I…
The infamous Kensington Runestone is kept in a museum just a few miles up the road from me. It's a carved rock that was dug up on a farm in the 19th century by a Swedish farmer, and purports to tell the tale in runes of a doomed Viking expedition that had come down from Hudson's Bay to meet a…
Earlier this week, I talked about the technical requirements for taking a picture of an interference pattern from two independent lasers, and mentioned in passing that a 1967 experiment by Pfleegor and Mandel had already shown the interference effect. Their experiment was clever enough to deserve…